There’s an article in the NY Times this morning about diminishing gay enclaves. Some of them have become quite famous over the years – Castro District, West Hollywood, Dupont Circle, and locally Hillcrest. Gentrification and the internet are some of the factors that have contributed to their decline in recent years. Are gay enclaves or “gay ghettos” still relevant and/or necessary?

4 thoughts on “

  1. …it’s one of the few places you can have a party with all your gay friends, your biker friends, and your white trash friends at the same time!The fun of partying is that you meet people who are all three. In San Diego, Hillcrest is still where much gay activity is concentrated, but many gays don’t live there like 10 or even 20 years ago. It’s the price of setting into a community, upgrading it, and pricing out the younger generation of gays.Martha should mind her own bedsheets. Oh, most of them are finding their way into gay homes.

  2. Thank you so much! I received your postcard in the mail today – it’s absolutely beautiful! I really really appreciate that! I got laid off of my job yesterday and getting it this morning made me smile. :-)Thank you again!Sara Ringham

  3. We don’t really have “gay” neighborhoods in Austin. We’re spread out all over the place. I kinda like it — it’s one of the few places you can have a party with all your gay friends, your biker friends, and your white trash friends at the same time!But yes. I have it on high authority from Martha Stewart that gay neighborhoods are SO last season …

  4. I read this the other morning and I do agree with a lot of it. In DC, the “weren’t prepared to give up our subculture” sentiment is especially evident as many “gay” areas are being populated more and more by straight singles and families. Our big annual High Heel Race usually has less and less gay attendees each year because we’re tired of the rowdy (and often drunk) heteros that crowd in 6 or 7 rows of people deep to watch the events.On a quirky note, I thought it was interesting that the NYT would mention a blood drive among the alternative events listed on the “No Halloween in the Castro” website, considering that many people originally headed to the Castro would be equally turned away from a blood drive.

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